ARCTIC OCEAN – U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Shannon Eubanks (left) instructs Petty Officer 2nd Class Ed Traver (right) on ice rescue techniques Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, about 715 miles north of Barrow, Alaska, in the Arctic. Ice training is required to qualify as a member of the ship's ice rescue team, which protects crew members and scientists conducting work in the Arctic. The Healy is underway in the Arctic with about 100 crew members and 30 scientists to deploy sensors and semi-autonomous submarines to study stratified ocean dynamics and how environmental factors affect the water below the ice surface for the Office of Naval Research. The Healy, which is homeported in Seattle, is one of two ice breakers in U.S. service and is the only military ship dedicated to conducting research in the Arctic. (NyxoLyno Cangemi/U.S. Coast Guard)

General Messages Weekly Roundup

All Hands selects several messages to publish in a weekly post to help raise awareness about specific messages and useful information for Coast Guard members.


ARLINGTON, Va. - A Coast Guard yeoman assists a fellow Coast Guardsman at the Coast Guard Recruiting Command, February 28, 2013. YNs are key problem-solvers, counselors, and sources of information to personnel on questions ranging from career moves, entitlements, and incentive programs to retirement options and veterans' benefits. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Etta Smith

Dear Coast Guard Family: Advice from an Assignment Officer

Once a month, Coast Guard All Hands will feature “Dear Coast Guard Family,” a column for Coast Guard families by Coast Guard spouse Rachel Conley. This month, Conley interviews an assignment officer.


General Messages Weekly Round-up

We’ve rounded up some good messages for you this week! Award solicitations, major changes to the Reserve Training Management System, reduction in mandatory training, Good Order and Discipline data is now available and more.


From the Homefront: Making the best out of some not so great orders

Sometimes the Coast Guard sends members and their families to places they didn’t wish to go. Instead of dreading it, learn how these families made it work and ended up falling in love with their undesired location. Sometimes the orders you didn’t want can be a blessing in disguise.