The newest ‘Ancients’ – Introducing the Gold and Silver Ancient Tridents

Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral Paul Zukunft, stands with the first Ancient Tridents, Rear Admiral Linda Fagan and Master Chief Petty Officer Richard “Shane” Hooker during the Ancient Trident Ceremony held at the Alexander Hamilton Custom House, March 23, 2017. The Ancient Trident Award, similar to the other Ancient awards (Albatross, Mariner, and Keeper), honors an officer and enlisted member for distinguished service in the Marine Safety field. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons)

Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral Paul Zukunft, stands with the first Ancient Tridents, Rear Admiral Linda Fagan and Master Chief Petty Officer Richard “Shane” Hooker during the Ancient Trident Ceremony held at the Alexander Hamilton Custom House, March 23, 2017. The Ancient Trident Award, similar to the other Ancient awards (Albatross, Mariner, and Keeper), honors an officer and enlisted member for distinguished service in the Marine Safety field. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons)

Written by Lt. Cmdr. Sarah Brennan

NEW ORLEANS -- Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class James Peterson with Sector New Orleans, takes a sample from an oil spill that occured approximately 10 miles southeast of Venice, La., in the Delta National Wildlife Refuge, April 6, 2010. Coast Guard Sector New Orleans, the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office - Department of Public Safety and Corrections, and Chevron Pipe Line Company (CPL), have formed a Unified Command and are working to minimize the environmental impact of the spill. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jesse Kavanaugh.

NEW ORLEANS — Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class James Peterson with Sector New Orleans, takes a sample from an oil spill that occured approximately 10 miles southeast of Venice, La., in the Delta National Wildlife Refuge, April 6, 2010. Coast Guard Sector New Orleans, the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator’s Office – Department of Public Safety and Corrections, and Chevron Pipe Line Company (CPL), have formed a Unified Command and are working to minimize the environmental impact of the spill. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jesse Kavanaugh.

On November 2, 2000, Adm. James Loy, commandant of the Coast Guard at the time, approved the Marine Safety Qualification Insignia. This marked the first opportunity for men and women serving in the Marine Safety program to receive recognition in the form of a professional insignia for attaining skills and experience necessary to meet the challenges of this long standing and vital mission. The Marine Safety insignia is a qualification earned by Coast Guardsmen assigned to billets with direct involvement in Marine Safety operations, and represents the personal fulfillment of the professional training and qualifications necessary for a Marine Safety career. It signals a commitment to continue in a career path involving Marine Safety Field operations. These operations include vessel and facility inspection, waterways management, pollution response and marine casualty investigations.

Crewmembers from Coast Guard Sector Honolulu and several partner agencies inspect containers at the Matson terminal on Sand Island during a Multi Agency Strike Force Operation in Honolulu Nov. 15, 2016. MASFO is held annually with joint efforts from the Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation and Honolulu Police Department to inspect and ensure the safety of products coming on to Oahu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur/Released.)

Crewmembers from Coast Guard Sector Honolulu and several partner agencies inspect containers at the Matson terminal on Sand Island during a Multi Agency Strike Force Operation in Honolulu Nov. 15, 2016. MASFO is held annually with joint efforts from the Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation and Honolulu Police Department to inspect and ensure the safety of products coming on to Oahu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur/Released.)

Today we took the next step to recognize our Marine Safety professionals by naming our first Gold and Silver Ancient Tridents. The tradition of naming a Coast Guard community’s “Ancient” dates back to 1966, when aviators created the Ancient Albatross, a title developed to recognize the longest serving pilot in the Coast Guard. In 1978, the cutter community followed suit by naming the Gold and Silver Ancient Mariner to honor the officer and enlisted member with the earliest qualifications as a permanent cutterman. In 1988, aviators established the Enlisted Ancient Albatross, and most recently, in 2003, the Ancient Keeper was developed to honor the member with the most experience in the small boat community. To date, there have been 25 Ancient Albatrosses, 10 Enlisted Ancient Albatrosses, 14 Gold Ancient Mariners, 12 Silver Ancient Mariners, and six Ancient Keepers. In a ceremony held at the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House in New York City, the Marine Safety community inducted its inaugural “Ancients” by naming Rear Adm. Linda L. Fagan and Master Chief Petty Officer R. Shane Hooker, a marine science technician, as the first Gold and Silver Ancient Tridents.

In honor of the Ancient Tridents and their extensive (and now ancient) careers, please enjoy this short film:

The trident is used to recognize the Marine Safety community; its three prongs represent the tradition of the 3-pronged approach to this vital mission: prevention, preparedness and response.

At today’s ceremony, the 25th Commandant of the Coast Guard, Adm. Paul Zunkunft officially instated the Ancient Tridents, honoring the careers and experiences of both Rear Adm. Fagan and Master Chief Hooker.

Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral Paul Zukunft, watches as the first Ancient Tridents, Rear Admiral Linda Fagan and Master Chief Petty Officer Richard “Shane” Hooker cut their perspective cakes during the Ancient Trident Ceremony held at the Alexander Hamilton Custom House, March 23, 2017. The Ancient Trident Award was established in 2016 to honor the officer and enlisted Coast Guard members with the longest time in the marine safety program.(U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons)

Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral Paul Zukunft, watches as the first Ancient Tridents, Rear Admiral Linda Fagan and Master Chief Petty Officer Richard “Shane” Hooker cut their perspective cakes during the Ancient Trident Ceremony held at the Alexander Hamilton Custom House, March 23, 2017. The Ancient Trident Award was established in 2016 to honor the officer and enlisted Coast Guard members with the longest time in the marine safety program.(U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Frank Iannazzo-Simmons)

Rear Adm. Fagan is currently the Deputy Commandant for Operations, Policy, and Capability. Her 30+ years of service has included positions as First Coast Guard District Commander and Sector New York Commander. Rear Adm. Fagan has extensive experience in the Marine Safety community, with service as a vessel inspector in Puget Sound, Wash., Mobile, Ala., and New Orleans.

Master Chief Hooker has served in the Coast Guard for over 28 years. He advanced to Chief Petty Officer in 1998, subsequently making Master Chief in 2005. Master Chief Hooker’s long career includes him serving as Rating Force Master Chief for Marine Science Technicians, Program Reviewer in the Office of Budget and Programs, Command Master Chief for the Deputy Commandant for Mission Support, and most recently as Command Master Chief for Seventh Coast Guard District. Master Chief Hooker is a highly trained pollution responder who has completed tours in the Marine Safety Field, notably as the school chief for MST “A” school in Yorktown, Va., at the Pacific Strike Team in Navato, Calif., and at Marine Safety Office in Portland, Ore.

To hear more about what becoming an “Ancient” means to Rear Adm. Fagan and Master Chief Hooker, please view this video:

Congratulations Rear. Adm. Fagan and Master Chief Hooker! Thank you for your service to the Marine Safety program! 

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